Friday, 10 February 2012

THE SELF-IMPROVEMENT CRAZE.

In previous posts, I've mentioned my credulity and how certain individuals took advantage of me. Though they sometimes believed they were doing me a favour, the end results were often disheartening.

One of these well-meaning acquaintances was Patrick, a fellow Amway distributor. After one motivational meeting at a local product distribution warehouse, he handed me a green pamphlet as he remarked, "I don't really have time for this course but it might be of help for building your business." As he explained briefly about what this Pursuit of Excellence course taught, I skimmed over the pamphlet. All in all, the seminar appeared to be a worthwhile investment.

My sponsor, the woman who enrolled me in the Amway "opportunity," also became interested when I showed her the brochure. With little hesitation, we both signed up for the week-long course in February of 1984.

Much of what the instructor taught was familiar to us, having already read self-help books. Additionally, the course covered the four types of individuals (controllers, promoters, analyzers, and supporters), as well as the reasons why they do what they do. Much of the material dealt with visualization, the unscientific notion that people can obtain what they vividly pictured in their minds.

As the days passed, I took copious notes in order to retain what I had learned. Contrary to my expectations, all that information had no effect on product sales. It didn't help me sponsor more people into Amway's multi-level marketing scheme either.

Adding to my disappointment was the realization that the course, and another two that I took afterward, didn't deal with the root of my chronic depression. I had wasted several hundred dollars on what turned out to be smoke and mirrors.

I now realize that it was my pride that kept me struggling to succeed in Amway. Even when the Canadian government sued founder, Rich DeVos, for tax evasion in 1983, I clung doggedly to my belief that I might become rich through that business.

Likewise, I remained a member of a cultic house church for more than fifteen years because I believed they were advanced in God's truth. Now I know that they were mislead and that many of the leader's assertions were blasphemous.

I wrote How I Was Razed: A Journey from Cultism to Christianity in the hope that my story would help and comfort others in similar circumstances. My goal is to have my memoir in print and e-book form this year.

I already have two paperbacks published. You're welcome to click on my books link or contact me directly for more information.